Practicing Gratitude this Thanksgiving

Gratitude does not come easy and often is not the mind’s default way especially in times of crisis and change. Periods of transition can be hard because with change can come uncertainty of outcome. Fear of what’s to come can leave people anxious, stressed and zeroed into or tunnel vision about the identified problem(s). Often times, holidays can be triggering for points of increased depression, anxiety and loneliness, especially during a pandemic where recommendations are to be socially distant which feel/seem counter to our innate human need for connection but necessary for community-wide health for all. Here are some small, but significant ways to keep a positive undertone to your life during the holiday season in the midst of a pandemic.

1) Stay connected with friends, family and loved-ones. Even as you are socially distancing during the holidays, there may be ways to stay in touch with those you love. Examples: virtual meet-ups, Facetime calls, drive-thru visits, etc.

2) Beware of idle time. Idle minds are the breeding grounds for wandering thoughts that can increase negative feelings and thoughts. Identify and implement coping activities of interests in order to occupy your time and give your mind productive focus: journaling, talking to a friend, listening to music, art, exercise, games, volunteering, etc.

3) Make a gratitude list or keep a gratitude journal. Bringing your focus and awareness to positive things in your life, such as your character assets, emotional and physical resources, and any other supports will foster a more positive outlook and highlight your strengths even in dismal situations.

4) Identify your personal values. Do you value self-development, fitness, authenticity, connection, adventure, forgiveness, for example? Make sure that your values are tangibly represented in various aspects of your life (e.g. career, personal health, relationships, etc). According to Acceptance Commitment Therapy, those that live their lives in accordance with their values tend to be more satisfied with their lives. Find productive ways to engage your body, mind, emotions, and spirit that is affirmative and encouraging.

5) If you are having difficulty with this holiday season, please reach out for further support. Speak to a counselor, your doctor, and/or loved-ones. Don’t isolate and keep silent. If you are in crisis, remember there are services available during the holidays and 24/7 that allow for anonymity and promote safety. See below:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255    https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

Georgia Crisis and Access Line: 1-800-715-4225 https://behavioralhealthlink.com/services/crisis-contact-center/

Other Resources:
Mental Health America of Georgia: https://www.mhageorgia.org/getting-help/

National Alliance on Mental Illness: https://namiga.org/

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration Treatment Locator: https://www.samhsa.gov/find-treatment

From our practice to you, Happy Thanksgiving! Have a safe holiday.